John Henry Asendorf in uniform The War Diary of John Henry Asendorf
The Story of a Pennsylvania Volunteer during the Spanish-American War in the Philippines and the Philippine American War
Sunday, July 31st, 1898  Diary View

July 31/98
It is not raignen in the Morning but very cloudy we are suddenly Ordered out on Outpost the whole Regiment at promptly 8 am we where lined up in Front of the Colonel tent and after recieving our Orders and listened to a good prayer of our chaplain we marched of taken with us Picks Shuffels and Axes we marched to a place called Tambo here a Road turns to the right and about 1/4 Mile out on this Road there is a Bridge across a smal Stream and Cap B. occupied this position and the Rest of the Regt moved on up the road to relieve the First Nebraska Regt at a place called Monastary here the Nebraska Boys had allready begun to build breast work there where 3 Guns of the Utah light Artillery stationed here the second Battalion took their in theese trenches and the first (3 Cop) held there place about 1/2 Mile back of us to the right The Lines of Entrenchment exstended from the Beach to about 75 Yards of the Monastery we where stationed as follows Co A on the Beach with 2 Guns of the Utah Battery - Co H then Co C wich closed the Gab between the Beach and the Monestery then came one more Gun of the Utah Battery and Co D wich closed the remaining trenches all day long we worked hard to strenghten our Breastwork we all took turn about until Night when the Enemy commenced to fire at us about 11:10 pm the firing began between the pickets and Outpost along the Road we all throwed away our Showels and Picks and grabed for our Guns by this thime Mayor Cuthberson who believed that the Enemy was going to make a Night attack ordered Co D E & K to take their position on our right the had no sooner taken their position than the firing began and all along the line the Artillery became engaged in death Earnest and fired Shell after Shell but we soon run out of Ammunition for each of us only had 50 Corporal McCanch was detailed to Camp and get more of the deathly stuff shortly after this we where reinforced by Battery H & K of the Regulars about 180 men strong each armed with the Kraig Jorgeson Riffle also by one Battalion of the First California by this time all Ammunition and the Rest of our Regiment wich had being in Camp on Guard duty had arrived and we all felt verry much relieved the Enemy had being firing right along without stopping ours but now we all started with more vigor then ever wich lasted about 3½ hours more during all this time we had a good opportunity to listen to the Crack of the Mauser and the busting of Spanish Shells all this time it raigned in torrents continuous our trenchs where like Mud holes but in the Morning we where relieved at 8 am by the Colerados. Landis and Sergeant Martin are on the Sick List

 

It is not raining in the morning but very cloudy. At promptly 8 a.m. the whole regiment was suddenly ordered out on outpost. We were lined up in front of the Colonel's tent; and, after receiving our orders and listening to a good prayer by our chaplain, we marched off taking our picks, shovels and axes. We marched to a place called Tambo. Here a road turns to the right and about 1/4 miles out on this road is a bridge across a stream. Company B occupied this position and the rest of the regiment moved up the road to relieve the First Nebraska Regiment at a place called Monastary. Here the Nebraska boys had already begun to build breastworks. There were 3 guns of the Utah Light Artillery stationed here. The Second Battalion too their [position] in these trenches and the First [Battalion] (3 companies) held their place about 1/2 miles back of us to the right. The lines of entrenchment extended from the beach to tabout 75 yards off the Monastery. We were stationed as follows: Co. A on the beach with 2 guns of the Utah Battery, Co. H, then Co. C which closed the gap between the beach and the Monastery, then came one more gun of the Utah Battery and Co. D which closed the remaining trenches. All day long we worked hard to strengthen our breastworks. We all took turns until night when the enemy began to fire on us at about 11:10 p.m. The firing began between the pickets and outposts along the road. We all threw our shovels and picks aside and grabbed for our guns. By this time, Major Cuthbertson, who believed that the enemy was going to make a night attack, ordered Co. D, E and K to take position on out right. They had no sooner taken their positions when firing began and all along the line the artillery became engaged in death earnest and fired shell after shell. But, we soon ran out of ammunition because each of us only had 50 rounds. Corporal [Alexander] McCanch was detailed to camp to get more of the deathly stuff. Shortly after this we were reinforced by Batteries H and K of the regulars, about 180 men strong each armed with the Krag-Jørgensen Rifle. [We were] also reionforced by one battalion of the First California. By this time all ammunition and the rest of our regiment, which had been in camp on guard duty, had arrived and we all felt very much relieved. The enemy had been firing right along without stopping ours. Now we all started [to return fire] with more vigor than ever which lasted about 3½ hours more. During this time we had a good opportunity to listen to the crack of the Mauser and the bursting of Spanish shells. All this time it rained in torrents continuously. Our trenches were like mud holes but in the morning we were relieved at 8 a.m. by the
Colorados. [Jacob] Landis and Sergeant Martin are on the Sick List.
Soldiers mentioned
on this date:

CUTHBERTSON, Harry C.
LANDIS, Jacob
MARTIN, William
McCANCH, Alexander

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